Categories
Arizona HOA Board Members

HOA Board Meeting Boot-Camp: What Every HOA Board Member in Arizona Needs to Know

The nominations tendered. The ballots cast and tallied. Suddenly you are on the Board. What was once whim gone as reality settles in and the first Board Meeting closes in on you… What’s your job again?

Getting on the Board is easier than you might think! Serving is something else. As a volunteer, you are required to serve and protect the fiduciary interests of the Association for no pay! Did they even train you for this? Probably not!

Never fear! We are here to help with these just-in-time emergency boot-camp pointers for handling and managing your meetings with professional precision. We address the most popular question at the end, but don’t skip ahead!

1.The Association is required to have an annual meeting of the membership every year. You can have more than this. But you need at least one. Also, all your meetings need to be held in Arizona. Don’t worry, you can still attend remotely, or even virtually! We dig into the advent of virtual meetings, virtual attendance and e-voting in our article <name>. Read more there to find out!

2. Notice of meetings must be provided to all members at least 48 hours before the meeting. Notice may be provided by any reasonable form of communication, including the Association newsletter, a clear and visible posting in the community, or email.

3. Emergency meetings do not require 48-hours’ notice. An emergency is any business or action that cannot be delayed for the 48-hour notice period. Not sure if it’s an emergency? Check with Association counsel!

At an emergency meeting, you must state the reason requiring the emergency meeting in your minutes. You also must read and approve those minutes at the next regular meeting of the Board.

4. Special meetings may be called by: (A) the president, (B) a majority of the Board, (C) by a vote of 25% of the members or any lower percentage provided in the Bylaws. If your Bylaws require more than 25% of the members to call a special meeting, it is unenforceable.

5. The agenda must be available to all attending members. It can be provided to the Members at, or before, the meeting.

6. All Association business must be done at meetings open to the Members, unless the business is subject to a statutory exemption.

This is called a sunshine law. It is a common fixture of public governance.

Under Arizona’s sunshine law, all member meeting, board meetings, or regularly scheduled committee meetings must be open to the Members or the Member’s written representative unless it is a topic that may be discussed in a closed session meeting pursuant to A.R.S. § 33-1804(A) or A.R.S. § 33-1248(A).

7. Each Member is entitled to speak to the Board and community on agenda issues. The Board may adopt time limits on a Member’s right to speak per issue as long as the restriction is reasonable and applied equally to all Members.

How do we determine what is reasonable? It depends!

The Association is installing a new ‘Children at Play’ sign near the clubhouse? The Board might reasonably limit each Member that wishes to speak to 3 minutes.

The Association discovered oil and is converting the Association monument into an oil derrick? We are gonna need more time for that one…

What? They brought cameras?

8. Members are permitted by law to audiotape and videotape open meetings of the Association. The Association may adopt reasonable rules governing recording of open meetings but may not preclude recording unless the Association records the meeting and makes the unedited recordings available to members on request without restrictions on its use.

This isn’t everything, but it’s a start! When you reach a question you have no answer for, and it will happen, remember you have an entire industry of professionals to help you learn, develop and grow as a Director of your Association!

When in doubt, reach out! Don’t forget we are…

Experienced Arizona HOA Attorneys

The Brown Law Group specializes in HOA representation in Arizona.  Our firm only represents homeowners’ associations and condominium communities in the state.  We routinely work with associations to make sure their board meetings are adhering to open meeting laws in Arizona.  We can also review any changes your association has made during the past year to use technology in your voting process.  It is understandable to want to use technology wherever possible to make meeting and voting decisions easier, but these choices can cause more problems down the road for an association if they are not done the right way.  Contact the Brown Law Group today at 602-952-6925 to schedule an initial consultation or make an appointment with our attorneys on our contact us page.

Categories
Arizona HOA Laws

What Your HOA Needs to Know About Assessment Payments in Arizona

Homeowners’ Associations carry a great deal of responsibility when it comes to maintaining the community. HOAs are often required by their governing documents to perform many actions, which may include maintaining insurance policies, paying for water or sewer charges, maintaining landscaping, caring for community facilities such as pools, playgrounds or golf courses, repairing roofing damages, maintaining common element areas, and much more.

HOAs cannot effectively meet these obligations without homeowners paying their assessments. Owners that are unable or unwilling to pay assessments may face legal action collect these unpaid assessments. Here is what you need to know about Assessment Payments. 

Obligation To Pay Assessments

All homes located within an HOA are governed by a contract called the Covenants, Conditions, and Restrictions (CC&Rs). By purchasing a property within an HOA, homeowners become contractually obligated to comply with the CC&Rs. Failure to comply is a breach of contract. The CC&Rs obligate homeowners to pay assessments to fund the various obligations of the community. 

Special assessments cover expenses which an HOA may not have sufficient funds to pay for from regular assessment payments.

Assessment payments are contractual in nature. A homeowner’s failure to pay these assessments is a breach of contract. HOAs can enforce their contractual rights to assessments by filing a lawsuit against delinquent homeowners when notices, letters, and requests from the HOA are ignored.

Arizona’s Property Lien Law & Foreclosure

In addition to the owner’s personal contractual obligations to pay assessments under the CC&Rs, property located within an HOA have a statutory assessment lien securing the assessment charges. A lien generally prevents an owner from selling or refinancing a property until the lien is released and assessments are paid, as it clouds the title to the property. 

Arizona Revised Statutes § 33-1807 and 33-1256 provide the statutory basis for the assessment lien. This statute provides that as soon as assessments become due, a lien is automatically placed against the property. HOAs frequently record a lien in their local county recorder’s office to make a public record of the lien in the event the home is refinanced or placed for sale.. 

When demand letters, breach of contract claims, and liens against a property fail to obtain payment of delinquent assessments, an HOA has the power to foreclose on its assessment lien. Foreclosure provides an avenue for HOAs to collect assessments, late fees, collection charges, attorney fees, and court costs for filing the foreclosure lawsuit.

HOAs may only employ the foreclosure option if one of the following is satisfied:

  • Assessments have not been paid for a period of one year; or
  • $1,200.00 or more in assessments are outstanding.

If either prong is satisfied, an HOA may proceed to collect the assessments due through foreclosure.

When evaluating a claim for foreclosure, it is important to note that some properties may already have liens in place. State and federal tax liens and first mortgages have priority over an HOA assessment lien. Other liens can include judgment liens, a second deed of trust, or a home equity line of credit.  The HOA assessment lien is superior to these liens.  It is important to discuss the implications of these liens in relation to the foreclosure process with your attorney.

Procedure To Collect Delinquent Assessment Fees in Arizona

Before an HOA can send an account to collections, homeowners must be afforded at least 30 days’ notice. The notice must be in writing and mailed via certified mail to the homeowner’s address. This is requirement is set out in A.R.S.. § 33-1807(K)  and A.R.S. 33-1256 which also outline that the notice must be boldface typed or in all capital letters. It must also include the contact information of the representative of the HOA that the homeowner can contact to discuss payment. The notice must also provide the following statement:

Your account is delinquent. If you do not bring your account current or make arrangements that are approved by the association to bring your account current within thirty days after the date of this notice, your account will be turned over for further collection proceedings. Such collection proceedings could include bringing a foreclosure action against your property. 

Once a homeowner is provided the statutorily required notice, and fails to satisfy the delinquent assessment balance, an HOA may send a homeowners’ account to collections and enforce its rights under contract and statute.

Find a Law Firm Dedicated to Representing HOAs with Assessment Collection

Whether your HOA is planning changes to your assessments or having issues with collection, The Brown Law Group can offer a many benefits to your association.  Our experienced team of attorneys and collection specialists only represent HOAs and condominium associations in Arizona.  We offer an alternative to the traditional hourly billing and it’s one of the major reasons we lead the state in HOA assessment collections.  Contact us today in our Tempe office at 602-952-6925 or our Tucson office at 520-299-3377 to schedule an initial consultation.  You can also make an appointment on our contact us page.

The Brown Law Group provided this article for informational purposes only and it does not create an attorney-client relationship.